Last edited by Nikoshakar
Wednesday, August 5, 2020 | History

2 edition of Fluctuations in the number of particles in the lowest quantum state of Bose systems. found in the catalog.

Fluctuations in the number of particles in the lowest quantum state of Bose systems.

H. Wergeland

Fluctuations in the number of particles in the lowest quantum state of Bose systems.

by H. Wergeland

  • 142 Want to read
  • 8 Currently reading

Published in Trondheim .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Bosons.,
  • Fluctuations (Physics)

  • Edition Notes

    Statement[By] H. Wergeland.
    SeriesArkiv for det Fysiske seminar i Trondheim, 1969, no. 6
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQC1 .T73 1969, no. 6
    The Physical Object
    Pagination21 l.
    Number of Pages21
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL5767829M
    LC Control Number71425164

      The coupling of two macroscopic quantum states through a tunnel barrier gives rise to Josephson phenomena 1 such as Rabi oscillations 2, the a.c. . This review is of three books, all published by Springer, all on quantum theory at a level above introductory, but very different in content, style and intended audience. That of Gottfried and Yan is of exceptional interest, historical and otherwise. It is a second edition of Gottfried’s well-known book published by Benjamin in This was written as a text for a graduate quantum.

    In Bose-Einstein condensation, a certain type of particles (bosons) occupy a single macroscopic quantum state called condensate at very low temperatures. This condensate is one of the most coherent states of matter known to date, allowing for a precise control of atomic systems . Statistical mechanics Thermodynamics Kinetic theory Particle statistics Spin-statistics theorem Identical particles Ma.

    The chemical potential and fluctuations in number of particles in a D‐dimensional free Fermi gas at low temperatures are obtained by means of polylogarithms. This idea is extended to show that the density of any ideal gas, whether Fermi, Bose, or classical, can be expressed in polylogarithms. The densities of different statistics correspond to different domains of polylogarithms in such a.   The fluctuations of the condensate are almost the same in the two ensembles with a small correction coming from the total particle number fluctuation in the grand canonical ensemble. On the other hand, well below the condensation temperature, the number of particles above the condensate and its fluctuation are insensitive to the choice of ensemble.


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Fluctuations in the number of particles in the lowest quantum state of Bose systems by H. Wergeland Download PDF EPUB FB2

Bose–Einstein distribution. At low temperatures, bosons behave differently from fermions (which obey the Fermi–Dirac statistics) in a way that an unlimited number of them can "condense" into the same energy apparently unusual property also gives rise to the special state of matter – the Bose–Einstein –Dirac and Bose–Einstein statistics apply when quantum.

A Bose–Einstein condensate (BEC) is a state of matter (also called the fifth state of matter) which is typically formed when a gas of bosons at low densities is cooled to temperatures very close to absolute zero ( °C). Under such conditions, a large fraction of bosons occupy the lowest quantum state, at which point microscopic quantum phenomena, particularly wavefunction interference.

So, it is slightly ironic that a new study has been making the rounds where the punchline is some quantum systems exhibit similar behavior to macroscopic systems of particles. In a new study published in Nature, a team of physicists from Imperial College London reports observing a phase transition in the state of a Bose-Einstein condensate Author: Alexander Bolano.

For a non-self-interacting Bose gas with a fixed, large number of particles confined to a trap, as the ground state occupation becomes macroscopic, the condensate number fluctuations remain.

John C. Morrison, in Modern Physics (Second Edition), Bose-Einstein Condensation. The application of quantum statistics to photons in a cavity was first carried out by Satyendra Bose in Shortly afterwards, Einstein applied Bose’s form of statistics to material particles and realized that at low temperatures a substantial number of particles in a gas could precipitously fall.

Starting from first principles, this book introduces the closely related phenomena of Bose condensation and Cooper pairing, in which a very large number of single particles or pairs of particles. This is the first book devoted to Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) as an interdisciplinary subject, covering atomic and molecular physics, laser physics, low temperature physics and astrophysics.

It contains 18 authoritative review articles on experimental and theoretical research in BEC and associated phenomena. Bose-Einstein condensation is a phase transition in which a macroscopic number of.

Content. Introduction Quantum field theory of matter From classical to quantum fields - Lagrangian and Hamiltonian field theory - * Constrained quantisation - Quantisation of the Bose field - Mode expansion - Harmonic oscillator - One- and multiparticle operators - Fock space - Identical particles - Bosons and fermions - Coherent states - Wigner function and phase space - Free systems and.

Particle fluctuations in mesoscopic Bose systems of arbitrary spatial dimensionality are considered. Both ideal Bose gases and interacting Bose systems are studied in the regions above the Bose–Einstein condensation temperature T c, as well as below this temperature. The strength of particle fluctuations defines whether the system is stable or not.

The aim of the present paper is to extend the investigation of particle fluctuations in Bose systems in several aspects: First, we consider mesoscopic systems that are finite, although containing many particles N ≫ into account a finite number of particles requires modifying the definition of the Bose function by introducing a finite cutoff responsible for the existence of a minimal.

systems are profoundly different at low temperatures. Fermions obey Fermi-Dirac (FD) statistics, whereas boson obey Bose-Einstein (BE) statistics.

In the classical limit, both distributions reduce to the Maxwell-Boltzmann (MB) distribution. The indistinguishability of identical particles affects the number of distinct states very strongly.

A new study makes the first observation of 'ghost particles' from Bose-Einstein condensates via 'quantum depletion': particles expelled by interaction-induced quantum fluctuations. Share: FULL STORY. Dr Amruta Gadge from the Quantum Systems and Devices Laboratory has created a Bose-Einstein Condensate (BEC) – considered to be the fifth state of matter.

Peter Krüger, professor of experimental physics at the University of Sussex, believes the fifth state of matter is “produced when the atoms in a gas become ionized.”. Moreover, there is a quantum-mechanical theorem about the number of particles that can occupy a quantum state. If the particles have integral \(\left(0,\ \ 1,\ \ 2,\ \dots.\right)\) spin, any number of them can occupy the same quantum state.

Such particles are said to follow Bose-Einstein statistics. If on the other hand, the particles have. In quantum mechanics, a boson (/ ˈ b oʊ s ɒ n /, / ˈ b oʊ z ɒ n /) is a particle that follows Bose–Einstein make up one of two classes of elementary particles, the other being fermions.

The name boson was coined by Paul Dirac to commemorate the contribution of Satyendra Nath Bose, an Indian physicist and professor of physics at University of Calcutta and at University.

This expression is used in the standard approach for determining the number of particles in the Bose-Einstein condensate. Let’s suppose that there are not fluctuations in the ground state, otherwise they destroy the condensate.

In the case with fluctuations the total number of particles in the system is written as follows: N=N 0+g(!) f(x. Figure 1: A Bose-Einstein condensate of photons.

(Top) Schmitt et al. produce a photon BEC by using an optical pump to excite dye molecules in an optical cavity. The surrounding molecules act as a heat bath and a particle reservoir.

(Center) When the effective size of the reservoir is large enough, the setup produces grand-canonical conditions and Schmitt et al. observe large fluctuations in.

We discuss the exact particle number counting statistics of degenerate ideal Bose gases in the microcanonical, canonical, and grand-canonical ensemble, respectively, for various trapping potentials.

We then invoke the Maxwell’s Demon ensemble [Navez et el, Phys. Rev. Lett. ()] and show that for large total number of particles the root-mean-square fluctuation of the condensate occupation.

The Bose-Einstein condensate: A macroscopic number of bosons occupy the lowest energy quantum state Such a condensate also forms in systems of fermions, where the bosons are Cooper pairs of fermions: ky kx ()22() Pair wavefunction in cupra s: te Ψ=−kkxy↑↓−↓↑ S =0 G.

An ideal Bose gas is a quantum-mechanical phase of matter, analogous to a classical ideal is composed of bosons, which have an integer value of spin, and obey Bose–Einstein statistical mechanics of bosons were developed by Satyendra Nath Bose for a photon gas, and extended to massive particles by Albert Einstein who realized that an ideal gas of bosons would form a.

bosons can occupy a given quantum state (no “exclusion”) • In Einstein showed that this implies that at very low temperatures bosons “condense” into the lowest quantum state, creating a quantum system with (potentially) a macroscopic number of particles—a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC).

The quantum fluctuations of the interacting particles in the ground state are responsible for the non-zero occupation of these elementary excitations at zero .6. The insulating state of bosonic atoms in a periodic potential (optical lattices).

At low temperatures we expect Bose particles to condense: most of the particles can be found in a state of zero momentum which helps to minimize their kinetic energy.

Such condensation, however, is unfavorable from the point of view of repulsive interactions.